Race

Tina Sacks


Tina Sacks is an assistant professor at the UC Berkeley School of Social Welfare. Her fields of special interest include racial disparities in health; social determinants of health; race, class and gender; and poverty and inequality.

Sarah Song


Sarah Song is a political theorist with a special interest in democratic theory and issues of citizenship, migration, culture, religion, gender, and race. She teaches courses in contemporary political and legal philosophy, the history of American political thought, and citizenship and immigration law. 

Michael Omi


Michael Omi is the co-author of Racial Formation in the United States, a groundbreaking work that transformed how we understand the social and historical forces that give race its changing meaning over time and place.  The 3rd edition of the book was released in 2015.

Lonnie R. Snowden


Lonnie R. Snowden is Professor in the School of Social Welfare at the University of California, Berkeley, with joint appointments in the School of Public Health and in the Department of Psychology. He is Director of the U.C. Berkeley-U.C.S.F. Center for Mental Health Services Research, and has served on numerous review and advisory committees for the National Institutes of Mental Health and Drug Abuse.

Lisa Garcia Bedolla


Professor García Bedolla’s research focuses on how marginalization and inequality structure the political and educational opportunities available to members of ethnoracial groups, with a particular emphasis on the intersections of race, class, and gender. Her current projects include an analysis of how technology can facilitate voter mobilization among voters of color in California and a historical exploration of the race, gender, and class inequality at the heart of the founding of California's public school system.

Kurt Organista


A leading expert on social work practice within the Latino community, Dr. Organista’s research focuses on psychosocial problems within the Chicano and Latino communities, acculturation and adjustment of ethnic minorities to American societies, minority mental health, cognitive behavioral therapy, depression in Latinos and HIV prevention with Mexican migrant laborers/Latinos.

Jovan Scott Lewis


Jovan Scott Lewis (Ph.D., London School of Economics) is an economic anthropologist who works in the field sites of Tulsa, Oklahoma and Montego Bay, Jamaica. His research examines the cultural mechanisms, institutional forms, and social practices through which an unequal living of, and coping with, the economy, its failures and contingencies are understood. Central to this inquiry is an exploration of contemporary inequality, which supports a generative definition of the economy in which poverty and race informs its articulation and spatial organization.

G Cristina Mora


G. Cristina Mora completed her B.A. in Sociology at UC Berkeley in 2003 and earned her PhD in Sociology from Princeton University in 2009. Before returning to Cal, she was a Provost Postdoctoral Scholar in Sociology at the University of Chicago.

Amani M. Nuru-Jeter


Dr. Nuru-Jeter's broad research interest is to integrate social, demographic, and epidemiologic methods to examine racial inequalities in health as they exist across populations, across place, and over the life-course. Dr. Nuru-Jeter considers herself to be more "exposure" than "outcomes" focused, which is consistent with her interests in examining social factors such as "race" and "social class" as exposures that serve as the foundation for the creation and preservation of health disparities across a number of outcomes.

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